This is a truth that Japanese knives are most sharpen than Western– Knife Depot Co.
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This is a truth that Japanese knives are most sharpen than Western

This is a truth that Japanese knives are most sharpen than Western

This is a truth that Japanese knives are most sharpen than Western Knife Depot

This is a truth that Japanese knives are most sharpen than Western.

Yes! This is sourcing from demand by professionals. Western manufacturer are targeting to home kitchens. This is opinion from us! So! The major Western chef knife makers make a lot of compromises regarding the quality of the knife in order to please even the lowest common denominator of consumers. Just as modern tomatoes have been developed to be beautiful and uniform on the shelf, and have lost some of their original rich flavor, so too have the compromises made by Western knife brands hurt the performance of your knives.

The first and perhaps most significant compromise, is steel, which is the heart of the knife. The steels used by many leading European companies are steels designed to maximize rust resistance and deal with abuse on the part of the user (such as throwing into the sink, grinding in cheap appliances, spending the night in a glass of water, etc.) which severely impairs the performance of their knives. European steels are much softer than their Japanese counterparts. The harder the steel, the greater the sharpness of the blade that the knife can reach. But because harder steel is harder to grind at home and unprofessional and more vulnerable to damage as a result of abuse, Western manufacturers have compromised on performance and chosen to produce soft steel chef knives that offer much less performance. The Japanese knives, on the other hand, are built as a hard-cutting steel sandwich between two layers of shock-absorbing soft steel, a technology whose roots lie directly in forging the katana swords, thus enabling much better performance. Hardness is measured on the Rockwell scale - in the HRC ranks. The leading manufacturers in Europe produce knives with a grade of 52-58 HRC, while the Japanese manufacturers work with steels that reach grades of 60-65, and sometimes also 66+ HRC. To illustrate the difference - a Japanese knife with a rating of 62 HRC is more difficult than a Western knife with a rating of 58 HRC by 46%, a huge difference. As we have noted, it is important to remember that harder knives are more fragile and not built to withstand abuse and use with excessive force. It is therefore advisable for those switching from a western knife to a Japanese knife to exercise discretion while using the knife and re-learn the force required to make a cut, not to apply unnecessary force to the blade unnecessarily, nor to rotate the blade during cutting of hard raw materials like pumpkin for example. It is important to remember that harder knives are more fragile and not built to withstand abuse and use with excess force. It is therefore advisable for those switching from a western knife to a Japanese knife to exercise discretion while using the knife and re-learn the force required to make a cut, not to apply unnecessary force to the blade unnecessarily, nor to rotate the blade during cutting of hard raw materials like pumpkin for example.

The second major compromise is at an angle to which the western blade of the knife is sharpened. The blade usually comes at an angle of 25 degrees, and sometimes even duller. This means that if we connect the two sides of the blade, we get a total angle of 50 degrees. Western companies make a blade that is resistant to damage, which is why many of the unprofessional users who purchase these knives do not keep their knives - store them scattered in a drawer, sharpen them with cheap electrical appliances, cut them on a glass board and throw them into the sink at the end of work. Match the knives to the "worst" consumer, in order to maximize market share and reduce complaints and returns. A professional or in-house cook, looking for a knife with performance, will have a hard time enjoying such a knife. , Cutting accuracy, The freshness and texture of food is an uncompromising issue in Japan. The Japanese mentality is aimed at maximum performance no matter what. Therefore, stainless steels that have conquered the West have not succeeded in Japan, certainly not in professional kitchens, where they are almost non-existent (For information on types of steels ). Japanese manufacturers make knives at a 12-degree angle, that is, 24 total angles.

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